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75% of People With ADHD Are “Chronic Procrastinators." Here’s How to Manage It

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Seventy-five percent of people with ADHD are considered to be chronic procrastinators. Here’s how to manage it.

Recent research, which is considered “the most recent and rigorous [research] in the field to date,” shows a relation between procrastination and “executive functioning” among those with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Executive functioning is basically your ability to analyze, plan, organize, schedule, and complete tasks at all — or on deadline.

This study came back with 3 major takeaways:

  1. Two symptoms of ADHD were tied to higher levels of procrastination: Inattention and Sluggish Cognitive Tempo, or SCT. According to the article, “[SCT] is defined by frequent daydreaming, tendency to become confused easily, sluggish-lethargic behavior, and poor memory retrieval.”
  2. A lack of “self-motivation” and “self-management”, which are both features of "executive functioning," are related to increased levels of procrastination. This may sound obvious, but this study is the first to look at specific aspects of executive functioning and how they relate to procrastination among those with ADHD.
  3. Only 35% of individuals without ADHD are considered “chronic procrastinators” - while 75% of those with the disorder fall under that category.

So what does this mean for you or your loved one?

  1. Target inattention and SCT in treatment in order to decrease procrastination and improve academic performance.
  2. Target weak self-motivation and self-management through self-monitoring: a strategy where an individual sets goals for their work, tracks his or her progress, and is rewarded for completing the work successfully and accurately.
  3. Implement "strategy training" - which requires the student to implement a specific skill in an academic situation. For example, a child with ADHD would be taught time management skills. He or she would then use that in an academic setting.

All of this can not only improve academic performance but can also build up an ADHD student’s confidence. Dr. Domenick Sportelli shares HIS strategies for ADHD management in our original series, Navigating the Ambiguity of ADHD.

I’m Kyle Kittleson, and remember - whatever you’re going through - you got this.

Source: Psychology Today


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