Food Poisoning

Food poisoning is an illness that can cause nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Food poisoning is caused by eating food that contains germs, such as bacteria, viruses, or parasites. One of the most common causes of food poisoning is norovirus. Two examples of bacteria that are common causes of food poisoning are Salmonella and E. coli. Parasites include tiny worms that people can catch in some countries.Read More

Health Tip: Prevent Food Contamination

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HealthDay

December 11

(HealthDay News) -- Storing edibles in the refrigerator may help prevent food poisoning, but it doesn't eliminate the possibility. Foodsafety.gov suggests how to keep refrigerated foods safe: Do not overpack your fridge. Cold air must be allowed to circulate to chill food properly. Keep your fridge between 32 ˚F and 40 ˚F Refrigerate or freeze perishable foods within two hours during winter, or within one hour during summer. Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Read More


Health Tip: Seniors at Heightened Risk of Foodborne Illness

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HealthDay

November 27

(HealthDay News) -- If you're 65 or older, your immune system probably is weaker than when you were younger, and you're at higher risk of contracting foodborne illness. The foodsafety.gov website cites these specific changes among older people: The gastrointestinal tract holds on to food longer, affording more time for bacteria to grow. The liver and kidneys may not be as efficient in ridding the body of harmful bacteria and toxins. The stomach may not produce enough acid, which helps keep gastrointestinal bacteria in check. Seniors may be more prone to chronic health... Read More


Spread Joy, Not Foodborne Illness, for Thanksgiving

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HealthDay

November 22

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TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Though foodborne illness can put a quick end to Thanksgiving festivities, that need not be the case, food safety experts say. That's because ensuring that homemade holiday meals are not only delicious but germ-free is within the grasp of not just experienced chefs, but rookie cooks as well. Food safety starts while you're grocery shopping for ingredients, said Brian Ulshafer, executive chef at Penn State Health's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. For instance, "keep any raw meat or seafood away from other foods in the cart," Ulshafer said in a... Read More


Health Tip: Cook Your Turkey Safely

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HealthDay

November 13

(HealthDay News) -- No one wants the Thanksgiving holiday ruined by a nasty case of food poisoning that stems from the guest of honor -- the turkey. FoodSafety.gov offers these turkey safe-preparation suggestions: If you'll serve a fresh turkey, buy it no more than two days before Thanksgiving. On the other hand. frozen turkey needs time to thaw properly in the refrigerator. Rely on a refrigerator thermometer to make sure the turkey is stored at 40 degrees F. Use a food thermometer to check that the cooking temperature reaches 165 degrees F... Read More


5 Smart Alternatives to Processed Foods

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HealthDay

November 08

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WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Is your shopping cart filled with heavily processed foods? Some might seem to be time-savers, yet cost more than fresh foods and offer few nutrients. Others might actually harm your health. The first foods to avoid are processed meats from hot dogs to deli cold cuts, including salami and bologna. Even those labeled "low calorie" are likely to have questionable preservatives, such as salts and nitrates. Studies show that these are the worst types of meats for your heart. Try freshly prepared turkey and chicken instead. In a hurry? A rotisserie... Read More


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