Angioplasty Outcomes Almost Equal Among Hospitals

Angioplasty Outcomes Almost Equal Among Hospitals

Patients who have an artery-opening procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have similar outcomes whether they're treated at so-called safety-net or non-safety-net hospitals, researchers say.

Mental Health Does Not Come With A Manual, It Comes With Friends & Family Support That Never Gives Up!
Join now

Safety-net hospitals, which provide care to low-income Americans who are uninsured or underinsured, tend to have fewer resources than other hospitals, the researchers said. In this study, at least 10 percent of patients who underwent PCI -- also known as angioplasty -- at safety net hospitals did not have insurance.

California researchers analyzed data from 3.7 million patients who underwent PCI at 282 safety-net hospitals and 1,134 non-safety-net hospitals between 2009 and 2015. The risk of in-hospital death was only slightly higher (4 more per 1,000 PCI procedures) at safety-net hospitals than at non-safety-net hospitals.

Patients treated at safety-net hospitals tended to be younger, had more risk factors and more often were admitted to the hospital after arriving in the emergency department because of a heart attack, according to the study published Aug. 7 in the journal JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

The researchers also found that both types of hospitals had similar rates of bleeding and acute kidney injury, which are complications associated with PCI.

"The patients treated at safety-net hospitals often have critical heart problems and other health issues that, in many cases, have not been adequately managed," said study senior author Dr. John Ambrose, emeritus chief of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco in Fresno.

"Therefore, the fact that these hospitals are able to keep mortality rates low and achieve these outcomes when performing PCI -- nearly matching non-safety net hospitals -- is quite remarkable," he added in a journal news release.

Patients who rely on safety-net hospitals often have little or no ability to choose a hospital or doctor based on quality outcomes, Dr. Theodore Bass noted in an accompanying editorial.

The Internet's Most Trusted Source For Mental Health Information
Sign up

This study is timely in light of discussions about health care legislation that could affect resources for safety-net hospitals, he added.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on PCI.


Copyright © 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Related Content

What If Your Anxiety & Depression Is Really A Sign Of ADHD?
What If Your Anxiety & Depression Is Really A Sign Of ADHD?

More often than not, when a person over the age of 10 is diagnosed with attentio...

Read more
New Patent By OxyContin Maker May Treat Pain But Comes With Addictive Potential
New Patent By OxyContin Maker May Treat Pain But Comes With Addictive Potential

Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, has received a patent designed to treat o...

Read more
Why Are Transgenders Experiencing More Mental Health Issues Than The General Public?
Why Are Transgenders Experiencing More Mental Health Issues Than The General Public?

Individuals who identify as transgender tend to experience higher rates of menta...

Read more
New Research In Schizophrenia Shows That A Video Game Can Aid In Preventing Hallucinations
New Research In Schizophrenia Shows That A Video Game Can Aid In Preventing Hallucinations

People with schizophrenia can be trained by playing a video game to control the ...

Read more
I was 12 When I Survived 9-11 But My Peers & I Are Only Now Realizing Our PTSD
I was 12 When I Survived 9-11 But My Peers & I Are Only Now Realizing Our PTSD

As the Twin Towers burned and eventually collapsed on 9/11, I was running from m...

Read more
How Running Helped These Everyday People Beat OCD, Depression & Anxiety
How Running Helped These Everyday People Beat OCD, Depression & Anxiety

When documentary photographer Martin Eberlen was diagnosed with ADHD in his earl...

Read more