Three-in-One Pill Shows Promise in Beating High Blood Pressure

Three-in-One Pill Shows Promise in Beating High Blood Pressure

A pill that combines three blood pressure-lowering drugs improves people's chances of lowering their high blood pressure, researchers report.

Sign Up & Receive Your Personalized MedCircle Digest Delivered To Your Inbox.
Join today!

The pill contains low doses of the three medications -- telmisartan, amlodipine and chlorthalidone.

The finding stems from a study of 700 people, who averaged 56 years old. All had high blood pressure.

Among those who took the so-called "triple pill" for six months, 70 percent had achieved their blood pressure targets, compared with 55 percent of those who received their usual care. Usual care meant taking whatever blood pressure medicine their doctor prescribed.

The rate of side effects was no greater among those who took the three-in-one pill than among the usual care group.

"Based on our findings, we conclude that this new method of using blood pressure-lowering drugs was more effective and just as safe as current approaches," lead author Ruth Webster said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. She's a researcher with the George Institute for Global Health at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

The study was presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in Orlando, Fla. The findings should be considered preliminary because research presented at meetings has not undergone the rigorous scrutiny given to research published in medical journals.

"The most urgent need for innovative strategies to control blood pressure is in low- and middle-income countries," Webster said. "The triple pill approach is an opportunity to 'leapfrog' over traditional approaches to care and adopt an innovative approach that has been shown to be effective."

High blood pressure increases the risk for heart attack, stroke and kidney problems.

"A control rate of 70 percent would be a considerable improvement, even in high-income settings," Webster said. "Most hypertension guidelines in these countries do not recommend combination blood-pressure-lowering therapy for initial treatment in all people."

Sign Up & Receive Your Personalized MedCircle Digest Delivered To Your Inbox.
Join today!

The findings, she said, "should prompt reconsideration of recommendations around the use of combination therapy."

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on high blood pressure medications.


Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Related Content

Can Smartphones Trigger ADHD Symptoms in Teens?
Can Smartphones Trigger ADHD Symptoms in Teens?

Teenagers who constantly use their smartphones may have a heightened risk of dev...

Read more
Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism
Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism

Children with autism show abnormalities in a deep brain circuit that typically m...

Read more
How the Office Seating Chart Affects Your Productivity
How the Office Seating Chart Affects Your Productivity

In my days working in an office, I was always most content when I worked by a wi...

Read more
What Your Social Media Posts Say About Your Drinking Habits
What Your Social Media Posts Say About Your Drinking Habits

Picture this: It’s the Friday afternoon of what has been a particularly stressfu...

Read more
Alzheimer's Risk 10 Times Lower With Herpes Medication
Alzheimer's Risk 10 Times Lower With Herpes Medication

Last month, Medical News Today reported on a study that found "strong evidence" ...

Read more