Health Tip: Understanding Palliative Care

Palliative care is designed to improve the quality of life and help manage the symptoms of a serious iilness, the U.S. National Institutes of Health says.

The focus is on keeping a person comfortable and happy, and can be provided alongside treatment.

Palliative care can be provided in nursing homes, outpatient clinics, residences and hospitals, and often is covered by private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, the agency says.

If a person's condition worsens, the focus may shift from palliative care to hospice, which involves making the person comfortable while preparing for the end of life.


Copyright © 2013-2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Sign Up & Receive Your Personalized MedCircle Digest Delivered To Your Inbox.
Join today!

Related Content

Can Smartphones Trigger ADHD Symptoms in Teens?
Can Smartphones Trigger ADHD Symptoms in Teens?

Teenagers who constantly use their smartphones may have a heightened risk of dev...

Read more
Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism
Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism

Children with autism show abnormalities in a deep brain circuit that typically m...

Read more
How the Office Seating Chart Affects Your Productivity
How the Office Seating Chart Affects Your Productivity

In my days working in an office, I was always most content when I worked by a wi...

Read more
What Your Social Media Posts Say About Your Drinking Habits
What Your Social Media Posts Say About Your Drinking Habits

Picture this: It’s the Friday afternoon of what has been a particularly stressfu...

Read more
Alzheimer's Risk 10 Times Lower With Herpes Medication
Alzheimer's Risk 10 Times Lower With Herpes Medication

Last month, Medical News Today reported on a study that found "strong evidence" ...

Read more